Police arrest more people for marijuana use than for all violent crimes combined

On any given day in the United States, at least 137,000 men and women sit behind bars on simple drug possession charges, according to a report released Wednesday by the American Civil Liberties Union and Human Rights Watch. Nearly two-thirds of them are in local jails. According to the report, most of these jailed inmates have not been convicted of any crime: They’re sitting in a cell, awaiting a day in court which may be months or even years off, because they can’t afford to post bail.

Study: Medical marijuana changes how employees use sick time

“Fact #1: Legalizing marijuana is bad for the workplace.”

That’s the stark warning from the Institute for a Drug-Free Workplace, a nonprofit that works to combat drug use among American employees.

“The impact of employee marijuana use is seen in the workplace in lower productivity, increased workplace accidents and injuries, increased absenteeism, and lower morale,” the institute writes. “This can and does seriously impact the bottom line.”

The Average Legal Pot User Spends $647 a Year on Weed

Headset Inc., a cannabis intelligence firm, reviewed about 40,000 legal marijuana purchases made in Washington State from September 2014 to July 2016. The Seattle-based company determined that the average recreational weed consumer is a 37-year-old man who buys traditional marijuana buds. The median spend by this customer was $647 annually, with an average of 19.5 days between purchases.

DEA Wants Inside Your Medical Records to Fight the War on Drugs

Marlon Jones was arrested for taking legal painkillers, prescribed to him by a doctor, after a double knee replacement.

Jones, an assistant fire chief of Utah’s Unified Fire Authority, was snared in a dragnet pulled through the state’s program to monitor prescription drugs after someone stole morphine from an ambulance in 2012. To find the missing morphine, cops used their unrestricted access to the state’s Prescription Drug Monitor Program database to look at the private medical records of nearly 500 emergency services personnel—without a warrant.